Addressing Anti-Feminist Violence Online – beginnings

I’m delighted to announce here that the Digital Media and Learning Competition 5: The Trust Challenge has selected FemTechNet’s “Addressing Anti-Feminist Violence Online” for funding.

This was a wonderfully collaborative effort that arose out conversations sparked by both GamerGate and the violences experienced in the summer of 2014 by female public intellectuals like Dr. Sarah Kendzior (which Eric Garland’s Urgent Dispatch from the Seat of White Privilege does a good job of contextualizing as gender based) and Slate.com author Dr. Rebecca Schuman.

Feeling unsure about life as a feminist scholar with a reasonably strong public profile I wrote the following to the FemTechNet community:

“I’ll be honest and say that I find myself feeling pretty uneasy these days. …with this summer’s threats against female scholars, the shooting on the west coast, and the latest wave of anti-feminist threats it strikes me that it might be a good time to talk about the above and what we can all do to help support one another. I’m also concerned about situations where institutions are themselves part of the threat and deeply aware that many feel threatened for a multitude of reasons these days.”

I was both heartened and saddened by the flood of responses from this relatively small community. It was good for me not to be alone in struggle – but it sucked to hear that so many shared my worry. The responses confirmed that the threats I was concerned about are real and also that women of color and transgender and queer folks face even greater risks.

Out of that discussion came our collective commitment to do something to address the harassment and violence that women and feminists are facing online. There are many who have participated in this effort and we are actively working to join in the chorus of voices that support the rights of feminists to work, write, speak, and live. I’ll be writing more in the coming days about our project and the connections that we hope to make with other efforts to address violence online.

For now, we are delighted to be in such good company with the other DML grantees and honored to be able to do this work.

The awards were announced March 10th at SXSWedu.

ASU Project Combats Online Threats Towards Women, Girls

DML Competition Press Release

Build a better DH syllabus

Prompted by a discussion on twitter (ht to Whitney Trettien and Daniel Powell) today (2/18/2015) about the inexcusable absence of women’s work from DH syllabi, I’m creating a space for collecting resources (the initial set up is derived from the DHSI course on Feminist DH that I teach each year with Liz Losh – if you’re not on here, it’s not because I don’t know and love your work – I just had precisely 6 minutes to get this rolling). Feel free to add yours in the comments and we’ll make this a running bibl of bad-ass DH and critical digital culture scholars. I’ll also note that there are already some great resources via dhpoco and GO:DH.

NB: I’m squeezing in additions as I’m able. This is currently thematically organized and that’s about it.

I’ll be adding in materials from Jentery Sayers’ syllabi shortly, in the meantime, you can check them out here and here.

Code, Feminist Critiques of Code Culture

Wendy Chun, “Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory”

– selections from Programmed Visions “Invisibly Visible, Visibly, Invisible” and “On Sourcery and Source Code”

Annette Vee, “Text, Speech, Machine…” in Computational Culture

“Coding Values in Enculturation”

Tara McPherson, “U.S. Operating Systems at Mid-Century” in Race After the Internet

Lisa Gitelman, Always Already New

Barad, Karen. “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Vol. 28, No. 3. (1 March 2003), pp. 801-831

— Posthumanist performativity : Toward an understanding of how matter comes to matter. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (2006).

Work and ideas that came up in the ensuing discussion: about work in conversation with Barad:

Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska, Life After New Media, MIT Press, 2012.

Anne Balsamo, Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work, Duke UP, 2011.

Tara McPherson’s work on Scalar, discussed in a forthcoming article in Difference. (A talk version is here:
http://mith.umd.edu/podcasts/tara-mcpherson-scholarship-beyond-database/ ).

–Micha Cardenas and Zach Blas, “Imaginary Computational Systems, Queer Technologies, and Transreal Aesthetics”

Micha Cardenas et all, in http://transreal.org/media-n-journal-2013-caa-conference-edition/ and http://www.e-fagia.org/digievent/2011/tx/michaElle.html

Maria Fernandez, Faith Wilding, and Michelle M. Wright, Domain Errors, (Autonomedia, 2003)

Caludia Reiche and Verena Kuni, eds. Cyberfeminism: Next Steps (Autonomedia, 2004)

Kim Christen-Withey’s work on Mukurtu as anti-imperialist approach to database design

“Fuzzy logic:” looking at measures of information as the continuum between 0 and 1 rather than the binary,

–connected to French Feminism: Kristeva, Cixous, Irigiray, Wittig.

–see work of Margaret Homans, introduction and opening chapter in Bearing the Word (Chicago UP, 1989).

    Play, Feminist Game Studies


Mary Flanagan, Critical Play: Radical Game Design (Introduction, Ch. 2. “Playing House” (17-62) and and Ch. 7 “Critical Computer Games” (222-249).

Janine Fron, Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie, and Celia Pearce, “The Hegemony of Play”

Bonsignore, E.,* Hansen, D., Kraus, K., & Ruppel, M.* (2013). Alternate Reality Games as platforms for practicing 21st -century literacies. International Journal of Learning and Media

Kraus, K. (2011). “A counter-friction to the machine”: What game scholars, librarians, and archivists can learn from machinima makers about user activism. Special commissioned issue on machinima. Journal of Visual Culture 10(1), 100-112

Liz Losh, “#Gamergate 101″ date: 10/17

Nina Huntemann (co-ed), Gaming Globally: Production, Play and Place and Joystick Soldiers: The Politics of Play in Military Video Games.

— (associate producer of the film) Joystick Warriors: Video Game Violence and the Culture of Militarism
— (produced and directed) Game Over: Gender, Race and Violence in Video Games

    Discipline/Access, Feminist Critiques of Technoculture

Radhika Gajjala, Cyberselves: Feminist Ethnographies of South Asian Women and of Cyberculture

the Subaltern: Weavings of the Virtual and Real.
Anne Balsamo, “Feminism for the Incurably Informed,” Ch. 6 in Technologies of the Gendered Body

N. Katherine Hayles, “Prologue: Computing Kin,” in My Mother Was a Computer “Prologue” and “Toward Embodied Virtuality,” in How We Became Posthuman

Lisa Nakamura “Indigenous Circuits” in American Studies Quarterly

Morgan Currie, “The Feminist Critique: Mapping Controversy in Wikipedia” in Understanding Digital Humanities, ed. David Berry (2012)

Heather Froehlich and Michele Moravec, Postcolonial Digital Humanities | Gender and the DHPoco Open Thread: A Corpus Analysis

Jasbir Puar, Homonationalism gone Viral (youtube video)

Johanna Drucker on Humanist Approaches to Graphical Display and her feminist book arts

    Program, Feminism and Theories of the Media Apparatus


Lisa Parks on drone vision: “Zeroing In: Overhead Imagery, Infrastructure Ruins, and Datalands in Afghanistan and Iraq” Ch. 14 in The Visual Culture reader, 3rd Ed., ed. Nicholas Mirzoeff, Routledge 2012

Lucy Suchman, “Preface,” “Introduction,” “Interactive Artifacts,” “Plans,” and “Situated Actions” Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human-Machine Communication

“Human/Machine Reconsidered,” published by the Department of Sociology, Lancaster University at

Genevieve Bell and Paul Dourish “Contextualizing Ubiquitous Computing,” in Divining a Digital Future

Murray, Janet Horowitz. Hamlet on the Holodeck: The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace. New York: Free Press, 1997

Blair, Ann. Too Much to Know: Managing Scholarly Information before the Modern Age. New Haven Conn.: Yale University Press, 2011. Print.

Nina Lykke, Randi Markussen, and Finn Olesen, “There are Always More Things Going On Than You Thought!”: Methodologies as Thinking Technologies: Interview with Donna Haraway” Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience, and Technology.

Kraus, K. and Levi, A.* (Eds.). (2012). Rough Cuts: Media and Design in Process. [Online collection of essays and artifacts]. MediaCommons: The New Everyday. [Collection includes 23 contributors; edited, curated, and published by Kraus and Levi with introduction written by Kraus]

Lisa Snyder on 3D Modeling

Miriam Posner’s Blog, especially “Commit to DH People, Not DH Projects”

    Archive, Feminist DH Projects


Alex Juhasz, The Views of the Feminist Archive

Kate Eichhorn, The Archival turn in Feminism

Katherine D. Harris, Forget Me Not! The Rise of British Literary Annuals, 1823-1835, a literary and cultural history of early British literary annuals. Ohio University Press, forthcoming June 2015.

— “TechnoRomanticism: Creating Digital Editions in an Undergraduate Classroom.” Journal of Victorian Culture 16:1 (2011 April): 107-112. Invited by journal editor, James Mussell.

Julia Flanders & Jacqueline Wernimont, “Feminism in the Age of Digital Archives” Tulsa Studies of Women’s Literature

Watch: Amy Earhart on obsolescence in feminist DH projects,
“Recovering the Recovered Text” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ui9PIjDreo

Bethany Nowviskie “What Girls Dig”

Trettien, Whitney Anne. ‘A Deep History of Electronic Textuality: The Case of English Reprints Jhon Milton Areopagitica’. Digital Humanities Quarterly. 7.1 (2013)

Kraus, K. (2013). Picture Criticism: Textual Studies and the Image. In Julia Flanders and Neil Fraistat (Eds.) Cambridge Companion to Textual Scholarship. Cambridge: Cambridge UP. 3.

Kraus, K. (2011). Prim Drift, Copybots, and Folk Preservation. In Megan Winget and William Aspray (Eds.) Digital Media: Tech

Michelle Moravec, Unghosting Apparitional (Lesbian) Histories

    Corpus Stylistics

Fischer-Starcke, B. ‘Keywords and Frequent Phrases of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice A Corpus-Stylistic Analysis’. International journal of corpus linguistics 14.4 (2009): 492–523.

Lutzky, Ursula. ‘Why and What in Early Modern English Drama’. Middle and Modern English Corpus Linguistics: a Multi-dimensional Approach. Amsterdam: John Benjamins (2012): 177–190.

— and Jane Demmen. ‘Pray in Early Modern English Drama’. Journal of Historical Pragmatics 14.2 (2013): 263–284.

Marchi, Anna, and Charlotte Taylor. ‘If on a Winter’s Night Two Researchers… A Challenge to Assumptions of Soundness of Interpretation’. Critical Approaches to Discourse Analysis across Disciplines 3.1 (2009): 1–20. Print.

Mahlberg, Michaela. ‘Corpus Linguistics and the Study of Nineteenth-Century Fiction’. Journal of Victorian Culture 15.2 (2010): 292–298.

— Catherine Smith, and Simon Preston. ‘Phrases in Literary Contexts: Patterns and Distributions of Suspensions in Dickens’s Novels’. International Journal of Corpus Linguistics 18.1 (2013): 35–56.

Selections from*:
Pahta, Päivi, and Andreas H. Jucker. Communicating Early English Manuscripts. Cambridge University Press, 2011.

Meurman-Solin, Anneli and Jukka Tyrkkö. Principles and Practices for the Digital Editing and Annotation of Diachronic Data. Studies in Variation, Contact and Change in English. Volume 14. Helsinki, Finland: 2013 http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/series/volumes/14/

Nevalaienen, Terttu and Susan Fitzmaurice. How to Deal with Data: Problems and Approaches to the Investigation of the English Language over Time and Space. Volume 7. Helsinki, Finland: 2011 http://www.helsinki.fi/varieng/series/volumes/07/

Gonzalez-Diaz, V. and Hodson, J. and Auer, A.. Language and Literary Style. Linguistics and Literature. John Benjamins, Amsterdam: 2012

Addressing Anti-Feminist Violence Online

Too many people have regular and sustained experiences of violence, including efforts to shut down participation in work, civic engagement, and social interaction. Women and feminists have been targets for quite some time, but 2014 felt to me like a year in which the threats were particularly frequent and the injuries inflected acute.

I’m not interested in promoting hurtful actions algorithmically or otherwise, so I’m not going to name or link here – you can find examples without too much digging. I agree with Anita Sarkeesian’s observation that “online harassment, especially gendered online harassment, is an epidemic. Women are being driven out, they’re being driven offline; this isn’t just in gaming, this is happening across the board online, especially with women who participate in or work in male-dominated industries.” I’d add that anti-intellectualism takes some of its most virulent forms against not only women, but also people of color, and queer and trans people.

In addition to impacting women, the online harassment has spread to women’s defenders — so that the silencing of women has become what Ian Bogost has called a “Voldomortian” entity in which speaking about these harassment campaigns by name invites attention and similar harassment. Young adults and children who find themselves ensnared in harassment, whether through their own work or by virtue of being a woman’s child, are particularly at risk and in need of support.

Feeling uneasy and frustrated with the social climate, I reached out to colleagues in the FemTechNet network. From these conversations a set of related, but independent efforts were inaugurated including private community meetings, public discussions, curricular engagements, and some long range planning. Among which was a proposal to the DML Competition “Trust Challenge.” The fifth in an annual series of calls for proposals, this year’s challenge argues “trust, privacy, and safety are critical to learning in an open online world.”

With FTN colleagues and strong institutional support from ASU, I submitted a proposal titled “Addressing Ant-Feminist Violence Online.” We argue in the proposal “feminists are at risk and engendering trust or safety in digital spaces seems difficult at best. Nevertheless, we can help create and sustain resilient communities that can foster trust, reduce harm, and support those who identify, document, and combat harassment.” To these ends we have proposed to “curate a set of best practices, and educational content for communities responding to anti-feminist violence online.”

We plan to publish our curated collection as an open-access digital book, utilizing the Scalar platform. We’re also planning a yearlong series of events to support the creation and use of the collection. We’re hoping to build as broad-based a coalition in this endeavor as possible – engaging with industry, local and national non-profits, networked advocacy communities, and U.S. universities and colleges.

We’re delighted to have advanced to the finalist round in the challenge. You can read the proposal, comment and offer support, and vote up the project by clicking on the heart in the upper left corner. You can also contact us at AAFO@asu.edu.

Working Bibliography: Anti-feminist violence online and transformative justice resources

I’m sharing here the helpful resource collection work of the FemTechNet network. Errors are my responsibility and I’m happy to add reader contributions.

Update 10/4: Fembot Collective and ICA respond to gamergate

Anti-Feminist Violence Online+

Association for Progressive Communications Women’s Rights Programme, “End Violence: Internet intermediaries and violence against women online”

Balsamo, Anne Marie. Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work. Durham [NC]: Duke University Press, 2011.

Blanchette, Jean-Francois, and Deborah G. Johnson. Data Retention and the Panopticon Society: The Social Benefits of Forgetfulness. SSRN Scholarly Paper. Rochester, NY: Social Science Research Network, November 22, 1998. http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=140048.

boyd, danah. It’s Complicated: The Social Lives of Networked Teens, 2014.

Citron, Danielle Keats. Hate Crimes in Cyberspace. Cambridge, MA: Harvard UP, 2014.

Coleman, Beth. Hello Avatar Rise of the Networked Generation. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 2011.

Creative Interventions Tool Kit for addressing violence without the police http://www.creative-interventions.org/tools/toolkit/

Daniels, Jessie. Cyber Racism: White Supremacy Online and The New Attack on Civil Rights. Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2009.

Davis, Simone Weil, and Barbara Sherr Roswell. Turning Teaching inside out: A Pedagogy of Transformation for Community-Based Education. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

Dibbell, Julian. “Julian Dibbell » A Rape in Cyberspace,” 1998. http://www.juliandibbell.com/articles/a-rape-in-cyberspace/.

Duggan, Maeve. “Online Harassment.” Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project. Accessed October 27, 2014.

Englander, Elizabeth K. Bullying and Cyberbullying: What Every Educator Needs to Know. Cambridge: Harvard Education Press, 2013.

Fox, D. L, and C Fleischer. “Beginning Words: Toward ‘Brave Spaces’ in English Education.” English Education. 37, no. 1 (2004): 3–4.

Fron, Janine, Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie, and Celia Pearce. “The Hegemony of Play,” 2007, 309–18.

Gajjala, Radhika, and Yeon Ju Oh. Cyberfeminism 2.0. New York: Peter Lang Pub., 2012.

Gurak, Laura. Cyberliteracy: Navigating the Internet with Awareness. New Haven, CT: Yale University, 2003.

Hardwick, J. “A Safe Space for Dangerous Ideas; A Dangerous Space for Safe Thinking” Hybrid Pedagogy, 2014,

Hinduja, Sameer K. and Justin W. Patchin. Bullying Beyond the Schoolyard: Preventing and Responding to Cyberbullying. 2nd Ed. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, 2015.

hooks, bell. Teaching to Transgress: Education as the Practice of Freedom. New York: Routledge, 1994.

Levmore, Saul, and Martha Craven Nussbaum. The Offensive Internet: Speech, Privacy, and Reputation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2010.

Losh, Elizabeth. “Bodies in Classrooms: Feminist Dialogues on Technology, Part I.” DML Central. Accessed September 2, 2012. http://dmlcentral.net/blog/liz-losh/bodies-classrooms-feminist-dialogues-technology-part-i.

———. “Learning from Failure: Feminist Dialogues on Technology, Part II.” DMLcentral, August 9, 2012. http://dmlcentral.net/blog/liz-losh/learning-failure-feminist-dialogues-technology-part-ii.

———. “Recasting the Bullying Narrative.” DML Central: Digital Media and Learning, September 25, 2014. http://dmlcentral.net/blog/liz-losh/recasting-bullying-narrative.

Nakamura, Lisa. Cybertypes: Race, Ethnicity, and Identity on the Internet. New York: Routledge, 2002.

———. Digitizing Race Visual Cultures of the Internet. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2008. http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=220871.

Nakamura, Lisa, and Peter Chow-White. Race after the Internet. New York: Routledge, 2012.

Technology and Confidentiality Resources Toolkit   http://tools.nnedv.org//

Turkle, Sherry. Alone Together: Why We Expect More From Technology and Less From Each Other. New York: Basic Books, 2011.

Tynes, Brendesha. “Internet Safety Gone Wild? Sacrificing the Educational and Psychosocial Benefits of Online Social Environments.” Journal of Adolescent Research. 22:6, 2007, 575-584.

Urgent Action Fund and Front Line Defenders, (video of panel) “What’s the point of the revolution if we can’t tweet? Women Human Rights Defenders speak out”

Warnick, Barbara. Critical Literacy in a Digital Era: Technology, Rhetoric, and the Public Interest. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 2002.

Transformative Justice Bibliography

INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence Community Accountability Working Document: Principles/Concerns/Strategies/Models

INCITE! Community Accountability (PDF)

Taking Risks: Implementing Grassroots Community Accountability Strategies

Creative Interventions Toolkit: A Practical Guide to Stop Interpersonal Violence

The Revolution Starts at Home: Confronting Violence within Activist Communities Beautiful, Difficult, Powerful: Ending Sexual Assault Through Transformative Justice

Think. Re-Think: Accountable Communities

Furthering Transformative Justice, Building Healthy Communities: An interview with Philly Stands Up

Toward Transformative Justice: A Liberatory Approach to Child Sexual Abuse and other forms of Intimate and Community Violence

Moving Beyond Critique

Philly Stands Up Portrait of Praxis: An anatomy of Accountability

INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence and Critical Resistance: Statement on Gender Violence and the Prison Industrial Complex

StoryTelling and Organizing Project – Community Responds to Domestic Violence (AUDIO)

Cultural Center Confronts Sexual Violence and Kicking Ass Part 1 & 2

A very short history of Wikipedia

The history of Wikipedia is something that has its own Wikipedia page and why wouldn’t it? The “most popular wiki on the public web in terms of page views” surely rises to level of notability required for Wikipedia entries. If you’re interested in the long history of Wikipedia, I suggest that you check out that page and the talk page. If you’re interested in a short version – read on. If you’d like to read more on the topic consider Joseph Michael Reagle Jr’s Good Faith Collaboration: The Culture of Wikipedia and Phoebe Ayers et al’s How Wikipedia Works and How You Can Be a Part of It. The latter has an excellent set of resources like cheat sheets in addition to a great historical narrative that reaches back to the 17th century. The former is a celebratory look at the culture and community of Wikipedia. I’ll also be working on a piece on the topic with Moya Bailey, so watch for that to come.

Here’s a very short primer:

Wikipedia is one instance of a Wiki, a web-based collaborative authoring environment. There are a variety of kinds of wiki software packages, including options for public, enterprise, and personal wikis. All wikis use either a simple markup language or a rich-text editor. Wikipedia uses MediaWiki and the associated markup language; there is also a visual editor available for Wikipedia, providing users with an interface that is more like that in a word document.

While the concept behind Wikipedia is as old as 18th century encyclopedias and discussions of a free knowledge web tool were started in the 1990’s, Wikipedia as such was launched on Monday 15 January 2001 by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger. A not-for-profit enterprise, Wikipedia is largely run and authored by a pool of volunteer editors. The WikiMedia Foundation is a related non-profit that employs staff dedicated to “encouraging the growth, development and distribution of free, multilingual, educational content, and to providing the full content of these wiki-based projects to the public free of charge. The Wikimedia Foundation operates some of the largest collaboratively edited reference projects in the world, including Wikipedia.”

From the beginning, Wales and Sanger explored different notions of authority, credibility, and production – including beginning with Nupedia, an online encyclopedia authored by experts and designed to be rigorously peer-reviewed. That idea fell victim to some very familiar issues around time to completion (think the lag in traditional print publishing!) and limited pools of expertise. A more nimble side or “feeder” project was developed that rapidly overtook Nupedia – Wikipedia.

And so in 2001 the amazingly rapid growth of Wikipedia began. With that growth have come a number of challenges, not the least of which is the remarkably gendered participation in editing. According to the 2013 Gender Gap Revisited study, at least 84% of Wikipedians are male and 60% of editors are between the ages of 17-40, with 40% coming in at 29 years of age or below. This and other inequalities on the site, both in terms of editors (and here) and content have received press attention in the last year. Within the Wikipedia community, efforts like the Wiki Women’s Collaborative and the Teahouse have sought to address some of the issues that give rise to the disparity. Alternative wikis have also appeared, some like the Conservapedia seek to limit the influence of equity efforts and others like World Afropedia aim to address the English and Western-centric quality of English Wikipedia.

Interested in more? Wikipedia in the Classroom Resource List, Feminist Interventions, Be Bold…Skip Review, and Teaching With Wikipedia

Tips from the road: pumping breast milk while traveling (for work)

A few days before a recent trip to talk at the University of Michigan I sent inquiries out into my social media networks, asking for tips on traveling and pumping breast milk. I had hoped for a few hard won tales but got crickets instead. So, in the event that someone else asks a similar set of questions, I’m listing a few tips below. Feel free to share others in the comment thread! In case you need it, I’ve also written a “Dear Colleague” letter template that you can send to organizers in advance of your travel letting them know your needs.

– be gentle with yourself, this is crazy absurd work.

– If possible, have your milk frozen when you go through security. In my experience, TSA dip-tests every liquid individually (!) but does not dip-test frozen breast milk.

– If you don’t already have one, get a battery pack and supply cord. There are rarely outlets in planes and hand pumping didn’t work AT ALL for me.

– Ask the flight attendant if you can use the first class bathroom to pump. While this is going to depend on the individuals involved, I had good luck here.

– When you go to pump on a plane let a flight attendant know that you may be in there longer – this lets them run interference with other passengers who wonder what’s taking so long.

– Take along your preferred disinfecting wipes to clean out your equipment when you aren’t near a sink or a good spot to thoroughly wash everything.

– I took my equipment (breast shield, valves, bag attachment thingy) already assembled on the plane in a plastic bag, which gave me an area to stage set up that was relatively clean and meant for fast set up

– Arrange to have a refrigerator in your hotel room if that’s where you’re staying while traveling.

– Pack plenty of your favorite storage containers and cooling technologies – I used the small storage bags because I could pump directly into them and lay them flat in the freezer for easy stacking for the return trip. I also used the flexible freezer packs in order to fit more into my cooler bag.

-According to sources at a breast milk bank, milk can be stored in a refrigerator for 7 days if you have one at your hotel. If a freezer is available, it can be frozen and taken on a plane with some blue ice blocks. The preceding isn’t medical advice so for more on breast milk storage and use see the CDC’s guidelines and/or KellyMom discussions.

– Check with your airline for guidelines on carrying breast milk on vs. checking it

– As always, drink a ton of water – air travel dehydrates and those are much needed fluids!

Good luck and feel free to share other tips and to share this widely with friends.

“Not a problem” – breastfeeding in academic workplaces

I’m emerging from a period of relative digital dormancy and there’s a lot to talk about (a new job, family, location, and research). I want to start with a post about things that have gone right lately – in particular, the support I’ve received in academic settings as a breastfeeding mom. In 2013 Miriam Posner wrote about the needs of breastfeeding and/or breastmilk producing moms at academic events and I followed up by providing a template of a “Dear Colleague” letter for use in communicating those needs. Both Miriam and I had recently had children at that point and we’d both run into the difficulties that many women face when trying to balance work and this particular set of needs (I’m also a big advocate for a tumblr called “Feeding the Baby” that was motivated by the desire to build support for all people feeding infants, regardless of the methods).

When I was invited to interview at Arizona State University (the new job), our second daughter was less than a month old and I was immediately concerned about travel and the rigors of a day long campus visit. In accepting the invitation to interview I was very upfront with ASU administration about my needs: I would travel with the baby, I needed someone to care for her during the day of the visit, and I needed to be able to breastfeed her – both on a schedule and on demand if necessary.

While I’m generally very comfortable being clear about needs, this wasn’t particularly easy. My partner and I spent time talking about how to handle the situation – was I really able to interview at this time? Could he instead take both the toddler and an infant alone, as I would do when he interviewed the week before? Was asking for accommodation going to sink my prospects? If I were to ask, what was reasonable?

I was in an incredibly privileged position – I had a wonderful tenure-track job at Scripps College and I had been invited to interview at ASU. I was in a position to say “if they can’t handle breastfeeding, then I don’t know that I want to work there.” A great many people are not in such circumstances. At the same time, I was very excited about the opportunities and I was eager not to have it all fall apart. I chose to travel with baby and steeled myself for any potential consequences.

When I asked for help with childcare and nursing needs the response was a good, if somewhat frustrating one: “I’ve never dealt with that before, but we’ll see what can be done.” The commitment by the administration to support me as a new mom was good and it came without hesitation. I was relieved. At the same time, there are a host of problems with the sense that this was a novel problem – it is symptomatic of a national and academic culture that acts as if motherhood is an aberration in the workforce and that limits the possibilities for women who want to work and have families. It would have been even better to offer a more affirmative “we will do what it takes” instead of “we’ll see what we can do,” which I feared was going to be nothing.

Nevertheless, this got done right this time. I was reimbursed for childcare (I did have to find that on my own) and I had a private room in the English department in which to breastfeed my daughter. My schedule included time to nurse and I was able to give the woman who cared for our daughter my room location and schedule ahead of time. This meant that when the baby needed to eat halfway through my formal interview, she was able to bring her to me. I nursed right there while talking with five or six colleagues about my research and teaching. It spoke volumes that no one batted an eye. I was supported by my future department and institution in ways that made it possible for me to successfully interview during an incredibly challenging moment in my life.

I’m happy to say that this has been a consistent experience since my arrival at ASU. During new employee sessions the Human Resources staff went out of their way to make me feel comfortable and offered access to an established “private room” and a private office when that room was occupied. Every time I’ve asked for accommodation during an event like our fall retreat, receptions, and information sessions people have immediately responded with access to private rooms that have locked doors, power outlets, and a place to sit – when necessary, refrigeration has also been provided.

It’s been really wonderful and I applaud ASU. What remains frustrating is that this shouldn’t be something worth marking – such support should ALWAYS be in place. Miriam and I wrote last year because my experience is not particularly common. I’ve had to personally intervene in other settings to ensure that women can store breastmilk at day-long events (no, breastmilk is not a biohazard) or to point out to colleagues that women shouldn’t be penalized by missing out on large blocks of events (or, heaven forbid career opportunities) because they need to provide for a child.

The response to the requests of a breastfeeding or breastmilk producing mother should always be the one I got from Patrick Tonk when I asked for similar help while giving a talk at the University of Michigan’s Data, Social Justice, and Humanities event: “not a problem.”

One final note – I’ve largely spoken in terms of “the ASU administration” because the consistency of the response to my needs demonstrates an institutional commitment to supporting women. At the same time, I am acutely aware that “the administration” that I engaged with was made up of individuals dedicated to supporting women – so thanks to George Justice, Matthew Garcia, Mark Lussier, Karen Silva, the HR staff on the Tempe campus, and many of the staff in the Dean of Faculty’s office for your support.

Update: See Carolyn Druker’s piece on the topic too!

Feminist Digital Humanities: Theoretical, Social, and Material Engagements around Making and Breaking Computational Media

Here’s our Digital Humanities Summer Institute (DHSI) course

Elizabeth Losh, University of California, San Diego

Jacque Wernimont, Scripps College

Although there is a deep history of feminist engagement with technology, projects like FemTechNet argue that such history is often hidden and feminist thinkers are frequently siloed. In order to address this, the seminar will offer a set of background readings to help make visible the history of feminist engagement with technology, as well as facilitate small-scale exploratory collaboration during the seminar.

Our reading selections bring a variety of feminist technology critiques in Media Studies, Human-Computer Interaction, Science and Technology Studies, and related fields into conversation with work in Digital Humanities. Each session is organized by a keyword – a term that is central to feminist theoretical and practical engagements with technology – and will begin with a discussion of that term in light of our readings. The remainder of each session will be spent learning about and tinkering with Processing, a programming tool that will allow participants to engage in their own critical making processes.

Pushing against instrumentalist assumptions regarding the value and efficacy of certain digital tools, we will be asking participants to think hard about the affordances and constraints of digital technologies. While we will be engaging with a wide range of tools/systems in our readings and discussions, we anticipate that the more hands-on engagement with Processing will help participants think about operations of interface, input, output, and mediation. In addition to the expanded theoretical framework, participants can expect to come away with a new set of pedagogical models using Processing that they can adapt and use for teaching at their own institutions.

 

A couple of notes:

There are a handful of items that are listed here that did not make it into the coursepack – we will be making digital/paper copies available as needed.

 

The syllabus is organized around a series of keywords. Our daily schedule will involve 1-2 hours of discussion of the readings in light of our keyword of the day, discussions of the making/breaking sessions of the previous day, a short intro to a technology or tool and then some tinkering. The “reference texts” are not included in the reader – we will bring copies of these for participants to refer to as needed.

 

We’ve tried to keep the reading load manageable and encourage everyone to read these pieces well in advance of our discussions.

 

 

Outline of work

 

Day one: Code, Feminist Critiques of Code Culture

 

Wendy Chun, “Enduring Ephemeral, or the Future Is a Memory”

http://aestech.wikischolars.columbia.edu/file/view/Hui%20Kyong%20Chun–the_enduring_ephemeral_or.pdf/442522752/Hui%20Kyong%20Chun–the_enduring_ephemeral_or.pdf

 

– selections from Programmed Visions “Invisibly Visible, Visibly, Invisible” and “On Sourcery and Source Code”

 

Annette Vee, “Text, Speech, Machine…” in Computational Culture

http://computationalculture.net/article/text-speech-machine-metaphors-for-computer-code-in-the-law

 

— “Coding Values in Enculturation”http://enculturation.gmu.edu/node/5268

 

Tara McPherson, “U.S. Operating Systems at Mid-Century” in Race After the Internet

 

Critical Code Studies – Basic Language Rules in Processing

 

Reference Texts:

Getting Started with Processing

Processing: A Programming Handbook for Visual Designers and Artists

 

Day Two: Play, Feminist Game Studies

 

Mary Flanagan Critical Play: Radical Game Design (Introduction, Ch. 2. “Playing House” (17-62) and and Ch. 7 “Critical Computer Games” (222-249).

 

Janine Fron, Tracy Fullerton, Jacquelyn Ford Morie, and Celia Pearce,  “The Hegemony of Play

http://lmc.gatech.edu/~cpearce3/PearcePubs/HegemonyOfPlayFINAL.pdf

 

Reference Text: The Nature of Code: Simulating Natural Systems with Processing

 

Day Three: Discipline/Access, Feminist Critiques of Technoculture

 

Anne Balsamo, “Feminism for the Incurably Informed,” Ch. 6 in Technologies of the Gendered Body

 

N. Katherine Hayles, “Prologue: Computing Kin,” in My Mother Was a Computer  “Prologue” and “Toward Embodied Virtuality,” in How We Became Posthuman

 

Lisa Nakamura on labor of women of color in tech manufacturing (to be provided)

 

Reference Text: Arduino Cookbook

 

Day Four: Program, Feminism and Theories of the Media Apparatus

 

Lisa Parks on drone vision: “Zeroing In: Overhead Imagery, Infrastructure Ruins, and Datalands in Afghanistan and Iraq” Ch. 14 in The Visual Culture reader, 3rd Ed., ed. Nicholas Mirzoeff, Routledge 2012

 

Lucy Suchman, “Preface,” “Introduction,” “Interactive Artifacts,” “Plans,” and “Situated Actions” Plans and Situated Actions: The Problem of Human-Machine Communication

 

–“Human/Machine Reconsidered,” published by the Department of Sociology, Lancaster University at http://www.comp.lancs.ac.uk/sociology/soc040ls.html

 

Genevieve Bell and Paul Dourish “Contextualizing Ubiquitous Computing,” in Divining a Digital Future

 

Nina Lykke, Randi Markussen, and Finn Olesen, “There are Always More Things Going On Than You Thought!”: Methodologies as Thinking Technologies: Interview with Donna Haraway” Bits of Life: Feminism at the Intersections of Media, Bioscience, and Technology.

 

Reference Text: Making Things See: 3D vision with Kinect, Processing, Arduino, and MakerBot

 

Day five: Archive, Feminist DH Projects

 

Julia Flanders & Jacqueline Wernimont, “Feminism in the Age of Digital Archives”

 

Watch: Amy Earhart on obsolescence in feminist DH projects,

“Recovering the Recovered Text” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ui9PIjDreo

Bethany Nowviskie “What Girls Dig”

http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/static/debates/text/3
Reference Text: Visualizing Data: Exploring and Explaining Data with the Processing Environment

 

Gendered Risk: Feminist Programming

I recently heard Audrey Bilger of Claremont McKenna’s Center for Writing and Public Discourse talk about the ways that social media can help bring certain feminist issues to the fore – in her example, the exclusions of women of color from mainstream feminist movements by way of the #solidarityisforwhitewomen hashtag. While a lot went wrong in the mainstream coverage of that story, including the elision of Mikki Kendall’s role in initiating the conversation, it is true that a social media event helped to continue an important conversation

At the same time, the recent furor over Twitter’s user blocking policy change and then quick reversal reminds us that social media spaces are also sites of potential threat and abuses, where stalkers and trolls often are able to work with relative impunity. Women are systematically harassed not only in media venues, but in online gaming and knowledge building communities as well. There is a reason that less than 10% of Wikipedia editors are women. Things don’t look much better from the tech infrastructure side either – as HASTAC director Cathy Davidson notes, the number of women entering the field of computer science has declined since 1993.

Enter into this space Arielle Schlesinger’s “Feminism and Programming” blog on HASTAC. Schlesinger’s questions are important – how do we abstract in non-normative ways? What would it mean to encode our knowledge and to shape our interfaces in ways that would recognize differences through non-binary paradigms? Is it possible to imagine a feminist programming language? What is at stake in Schlesinger’s research are life opportunities – the ability to inhabit digital and analog spaces without having to sacrifice some fundamental part of your life or your being. Sound hyperbolic? It’s not. Our tools mediate every part of our lives and our ways of being. The logic of our (computing) systems can inhibit thinking through questions of race, class, and gender, as Tara McPherson suggests, and these compartmentalized habits of thought inform our everyday lives.

The question that Schlesinger’s research asks then, is how can our technologies – here programming languages – be less violent, do less violence? It is a practical and ethical question of great importance. I’m delighted that Schlesinger is raising it in her work and in a public space like HASTAC. I’m also heartened by the wonderful responses – many by computer scientists/programmers – in that forum. There is an opportunity for some powerful engagement and thinking to occur.

At the same time, however, Schlesinger has now become a target – while HASTAC conversations have been productive, those on Reddit and 4chan have not been. Schlesinger has become a target on Twitter as well. As is so typical these days, a parody of the project, under the name “Feminist Software Foundation” attempts to undermine a genuine conversation. Consequently, Schlesinger’s efforts to bring her research into a public discussion teach us again about the gendered risks entailed in public intellectualism and open inquiry. For some – it isn’t entirely safe to even ask a question

Want to follow the conversation? #femtech. Working bibliography on this topic.

Feminist Programming – collecting resources

The FemTechNet group recently discussed a question posed by Pitzer College student Ari Schlesinger on the topic of feminist programming – it’s a topic related to my work on feminist markup and digital architectures, so I read the discussion with interest. What follows are some of the ideas that arose in the discussion  – gathered here as a way of starting a kind of bibliography. I have a previous post on Feminism and Technology that is also a bibliography. I’m also hopeful that this post will operate as a space of further discussion on the topic. Thanks for the great thinking go to the many members of FemTechNet network who contributed to the discussion – I’ve edited to make this more of a working bibliography, rather than a transcript of the conversation.

Ari’s question paraphrased: if object oriented programming reifies normative subject object theory, what would a feminist programming language look like? Are there possibilities within imperative, functional, or logical programming languages that would enable feminist programming?

Ari was already thinking about Karen Barad’s work in Posthumanist Performativity and about feminist logics.

Barad, Karen. “Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter.” Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society, Vol. 28, No. 3. (1 March 2003), pp. 801-831

also: Barad, Karen. Posthumanist performativity : Toward an understanding of how matter comes to matter. In Deborah Orr (ed.), Belief, Bodies, and Being: Feminist Reflections on Embodiment. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (2006).

Work and ideas that came up in the ensuing discussion:

In conversation with Barad:

–Sarah Kember and Joanna Zylinska, Life After New Media, MIT Press, 2012.

–Anne Balsamo, Designing Culture: The Technological Imagination at Work, Duke UP, 2011.

Tara McPherson’s work on Scalar, discussed in a forthcoming article in Difference.  (A talk version is here:
http://mith.umd.edu/podcasts/tara-mcpherson-scholarship-beyond-database/ ).

Zach Blas and his Queer Technologies / transCoder project

–with Micha Cardenas http://transreal.org/imaginary-computational-systems-queer-technologies-and-transreal-aesthetics/

Micha Cardenas and others in http://transreal.org/media-n-journal-2013-caa-conference-edition/ and http://www.e-fagia.org/digievent/2011/tx/michaElle.html

Maria Fernandez, Faith Wilding, and Michelle M. Wright, Domain Errors, (Autonomedia, 2003)

Caludia Reiche and Verena Kuni, eds. Cyberfeminism: Next Steps (Autonomedia, 2004)

Kim Christen’s work on Mukurtu as feminist/anti-imperialist approach to database design

Thinking about differences between in analog and digital computers in Wendy Chun’s work

“Fuzzy logic:” looking at measures of information as the continuum between 0 and 1 rather than the binary,

–connected to French Feminism  Kristeva, Cixous, Irigiray, Wittig.

–see work of  Margaret Homans, introduction and opening chapter in Bearing the Word (Chicago UP, 1989).

Information Theory from a feminist perspective (new area to explore)

Liz Losh and I will be teaching a Feminist DH course at DHSI this summer, utilizing Processing, which is worth checking out as arising from a different paradigm.

Melissa Terras on the Text Encoding Initiative (markup protocols) (need the url)

I’m sure that there is more that is worth bringing into the discussion – please post a comment if you have thoughts!

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